Sunday, January 13, 2013

BOOTS ON THE GROUND IN MALI

MILITARY BUREAU: S-2 , INTEL DIV.
CLASSIFIED REPORT: EYES ONLY......JAN 14, 2013



TO: BENGHAZI POST
FROM: S2, INTEL//MILITARY BUREAU
SUBJ: MALI BOOTS ON THE GROUND

BELOW FIND A QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE TO UNITS CURRENTLY OPERATING  IN GAO, MALI, AFRICA:


FRIENDLY FORCES:

MALIAN ARMY
FRANCE:  ARMY/MARINES, AIR FORCE
UNITED STATES: SUPPORT UNITS: TANKER REFUELERS, COMMUNICATIONS, POSSIBLE DRONE INVOLVEMENT.
UNITED KINGDOM:   C-17 TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT
ALGERIA: PROVIDING AIRSPACE CLEARANCE FOR AIRCRAFT OVERFLIGHTS FROM EUROPE.
NIGER : 500  MILITARY PERSONNEL
BURKINA FASO: 500 MILITARY PERSONNEL
SENEGAL: 500 MILITARY PERSONNEL
NIGERIA: N/A # MILITARY PERSONNEL
TOTAL FRIENDLY FORCES WILL INCLUDE 3000 STRONG AFRICAN FORCE COMMANDED BY NIGERIAN MAJOR GENERAL SHEHU USMAN ABDULKADIR.

REBEL/INSURGENT FORCES:

MNLA (NATIONAL MOVEMENT FOR THE LIBERATION OF AZAWAD)//TUAREG
FLNA (NATIONAL FRONT FOR THE LIBERATION OF AZAWAD)//NON-SHARIA
GANDA KOY (MASTERS OF THE EARTH)//SONGHAI ETHNIC//
GANDA IZO//FULANI ETHNIC//MOPTI
AQIM (AL-QAEDA IN THE ISLAMIC MAGHREB//IFOGHAS)//TUAREGS/ARABS//FOREIGNERS//
LEADER: ALGERIAN MALEK DROUKDEL AKA ABU MASAB ABDEL
WADOUD & EMIR YAHIA ABOU HAMMAM; LIEUTENANTS: MOKHTAR BELMOKHTAR & ALGERIAN HAMID ABOU ZAID//SHARIA LAW
ANSAR AL DIN (..   )//IFOGHAS TUAREGS/BERABICHE ARABS, LOCAL ETHNICS//SHARIA LAW//LEADER: IYAD AG GHALI, TUAREG//SPOKESMAN;
SANDA OULD BOUMANA FROM TIMBUKTU//
MUJAO (MOVEMENT FOR UNITY AND JIHAD IN WEST AFRICA)//OPAQUE AL-QAEDA//AQIM SPINOFF//LOCALS AND FOREIGNERS//SHARIA LAW//FUNDED BY TILEMSI ARAB DRUG LORDS.

MORE DATA FWD AS MADE AVAIL....($$//&FFT)

REGARDS,

S2, INTEL

DIST: TXT, WWW, MOBILE, ANDROID, IPHONE---...
SECURED TRANSMISION

MILITARY BUREAU: S-2 , INTEL DIV.
CLASSIFIED REPORT: EYES ONLY......JAN 14, 2013

MALI: REBEL WEAPONRY REPORT

MILITARY BUREAU: S-2 , INTEL DIV.
CLASSIFIED REPORT: EYES ONLY......JAN 14, 2013



TO: MILITARY BUREAU
FROM: S2, INTEL
SUBJ: REBEL WEAPONRY REPORT

BELOW FIND A QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE TO WEAPONS ARSENAL IN GAO, MALI, AFRICA:

REPORT FROM FRANCE 24//JUNE 22, 2012:


"The Tuareg separatists who, along with radical Islamist groups, have taken control of northern Mali are preparing for the possibility of a counter-attack by the Malian army. One of our Observers, who recently travelled to the northern city of Gao, was able to photograph these separatists posing proudly with their military arsenal. One of their commanders agreed to tell us about how he and his men are getting ready to fight.

Our Observer, Assan Midal, is a Tuareg who works as a tour guide in the Sahel desert. Since the beginning of the crisis in northern Mali, he’s made several trips and reported for us from Gao, Kidal, and Timbuktu, the region’s three major cities. In March, these cities fell into the hands of the MNLA, the separatist Tuareg movement pushing for northern Mali’s independence, as well as of radical Islamist fighters from the groups Ansar Dine and Mujao, an al-Qaeda offshoot.

Midal went to Gao’s airport, where the MNLA rebels have set up a military base. There, he took photos of their armoured vehicles, military equipment and spoke to the rebels.

Colonel Intallah Ag Assai is an MNLA commander based in Gao. He says that after spending ten years in the Malian army, he decided to join the Tuareg rebellion in January.


 
Colonel Intallah Ag Assai


'We’ve been ready for war ever since we arrived in Gao in March. The airport serves as our base. That’s where we keep our weapons and all the other military equipment we seized from the Malian army. We already owned some military equipment before our uprising [which started in January], but we got our hands on much more by helping ourselves to what we found in army bases as we made our way north. I would say 60 percent of what we currently own was taken from the army. Right now, we’re fixing a helicopter and ten armoured vehicles. Thirty more of these vehicles are in working order. We also took lots of automatic rifles, of different calibres.
[The MNLA’s equipment also comes from former mercenaries for Muammar Gaddafi who have joined the MNLA’s ranks. After the Libyan leader’s death, many of them returned to Mali heavily armed.]

Our troops are ready to fight. For the past two months, about 1,000 men have been training here in Gao. Overall, there are 2,000 of us here [Ed. Note: This number is difficult to verify]. The new trainees are volunteers from Gao and the surrounding region. Most of them are in their early twenties. They train five days a week on a lot near the airport. We don’t pay them, but of course we give them room and board. They work out, learn military discipline, and are taught how to use weapons.'

(Post written with FRANCE 24 journalist Peggy Bruguière. )






MORE DATA FWD AS MADE AVAIL

REGARDS,

S2, INTEL

DIST: TXT, WWW, MOBILE, ANDROID, IPHONE---...
SECURED TRANSMISION

MILITARY BUREAU: S-2 , INTEL DIV.
CLASSIFIED REPORT: EYES ONLY......JAN 14, 2013

MALI: CLASSIFIED EYES ONLY

MILITARY BUREAU: S-2 , INTEL DIV.
CLASSIFIED REPORT: EYES ONLY......JAN 14, 2013



TO: MILITARY BUREAU
FROM: S2, INTEL
SUBJ: BACKGROUND ON HOSTILITIES, WEST AFRICA; MALI

BELOW FIND A QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE TO DEVELOPMENT OF HOSTILITIES IN MALI, AFRICA:


MARCH 22: SOLDIERS OVERTHREW PRESIDENT AMADOU TOUMANI TOURE (ATT), ACCUSING HIM OF INCOMPETENCE IN THE FIGHT AGAINST THE TUAREG REBELLION AND ISLAMIC GROUPS IN THE NORTH.

MARCH 30: ISLAMIST GROUP ANSAR DINE, SUPPORTED BY THE NATIONAL MOVEMENT POF AZAWAD (MNLA, TUAREG REBEL GROUP) AND AQIM (AL-QAIDA IN THE ISLAMIC MAGHREB), SEIZES KIDAL.

MARCH 31: THE REBELS TAKE GAO.

APRIL 1: MNLA TAKES TIMBUKTU, BUT IS DRIVEN BY THE ANSAR DINE AND AQIM

APRIL 6:  FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT JUNTA-ECOWAS (ECONOMIC COMMUNITY OF WEST AFRICA) FOR THE TRANSFER OF POWER TO CIVILIANS, WITH A PRESIDENT, DIONCOUNDA TRAORE, AND A PRIME MINISTER, MODIBO DIARRA, TRANSITION

MAY 21: PRESIDENT TRAORE, ASSAULTED AND LEFT FOR PARIS TO BE TREATED

JUNE 27:  THE MUJAO (MOVEMENT FOR THE UNIQUENESS AND JIHAD IN WEST AFRICA) TOOK CONTROL OF GAO.

JUNE 30:  ISLAMISTS DESTROY TOMBS OF MUSLIM SAINTS TIMBUKTU, AFTER THE DECISION TO CLASSIFY THE UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE IN DANGER CITY.

AUGUST 8: ISLAMISTS AMPUTATE ONE HAND A THIEF, ANSONGO. END OF JULY, THEY HAD STONED TO DEATH, AGUELHOK, A MAN AND A WOMAN PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITHOUT BEING MARRIED.

SEPTEMBER 1: MUJAO TAKES CONTROL OF DOUENTZA IN THE MOPTI REGION

SEPTEMBER 4: PRESIDENT TRAORE REQUEST THE INTERVENTION OF MILITARY FORCES IN WEST AFRICA TO RECONQUER THE NORTH. SEVERAL MEETINGS OF ECOWAS TO PREPARE.

DECEMBER 20:  THE SECURITY COUNCIL APPROVES UN RESOLUTION 2085, WHICH AUTHORIZES THE DEPLOYMENT STAGES OF MISMA (ISAF SUPPORT TO MALI), CLAIMED BY MALI AND APPROVED BY ECOWAS.

JANUARY 10: APPROXIMATELY 1,200 ISLAMIST FIGHTERS SEIZE KONNA, THREATENING TO CONTINUE THEIR OFFENSIVE SOUTH.
PRESIDENT TRAORE SEEK MILIOTARY AID FROM FRANCE. THE UN CALLS FOR A "RAPID DEPLOYMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL FORCE TO THE "SERIOUS DETERIORATION."

JANUARY 11: MALIAN ARMY LAUNCHED WITH THE SUPPORT OF FRANCE, A CONS-OFFENSIVE TO PUSH THE ISLAMISTS. BAMAKO DECLARED A STATE OF EMERGENCY AND PARIS ASKS IT NATIONALS "WHOSE PRESENCE IS NOT ESSENTIAL" TO LEAVE MALI.

MORE DATA FWD AS MADE AVAIL

REGARDS,

S2, INTEL

DIST:  TXT, WWW, MOBILE, ANDROID, IPHONE---...SECURED TRANSMISIION

MILITARY BUREAU: S-2 , INTEL DIV.
CLASSIFIED REPORT: EYES ONLY......JAN 14, 2013

MALI REBEL FORCES ASSESSMENT

Troop Strength and Weapons Inventory of
N. Mali Fighters



INDEPENDENT UK//MARCH 31, 2012--REBELS TAKE GAO

A government source in Niger who is talking to both sides of the conflict also confirmed the attack, but also asked for anonymity as he was not authorized to speak to the press.

The force is expected to meet more resistance in Gao, where the majority of troops are from the Bambara tribe. In Kidal, the majority of troops were Tuareg.

Malian residents of Niamey with family members in Gao said the city was under attack from multiple rocket launchers which soldiers who fought for Gaddafi brought with them after his regime fell.


MIDDLE EAST ONLINE//APRIL 5, 2012--COMBINED ACTION
By Philippe Leymarie

The recent Tuareg revolt began on17 January with a bloody attack on Menaka in northern Mali, followed by several successful raids on Malian army garrisons, including the base at Tessalit, which they took over on 11 March. The Azawad National Liberation Movement (MNLA), formed in 2011, has about 1,000 fighters, including 400ex-Libyan army soldiers. Since 2012 it has been fighting in “partnership” with Ancar Dine (Defenders of Islam) linked to al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb(AQIM), which today claims to control most of northeastern Mali.

The Joint Operational Military Committee setup in Tamanrasset, Algeria, in 2010 suffers from a lack of consensus between the countries bordering on the Sahara. Mauritania, in close contact with the French Special Operations Command, advocates a purely security-based approach, while Mali argues for long-term development, which it believes is the only thing that will stop people being recruited into Tuareg rebel movements or the katiba (fighting units) of AQIM.

CNN//APRIL 5, 2012--REBEL STRENGTH

Thursday, the regional group, Economic Community of West African States, met in the Ivorian capital, Abidjan, to discuss military intervention in Mali.
 
The MLNA, however, warned ECOWAS against the deployment of troops.
(Mossa Ag) Attaher told BFM-TV that the rebels have at least 3,000 fighters and any intervention "would be a disaster."
 
REUTERS//MARCH 31, 2012--ARMY DESERTS GAO BASES
 
Soldiers in the Malian army deserted the main military bases around the key northern town of Gao on Saturday after a rebel assault, military and civilian sources said.
One civilian source said rebels already occupied the two main bases around the town while another source just one of the two camps was now under rebel control. A Reuters reporter in Gao said there was no fighting in the town itself.




NEW YORK TIMES//FEBRUARY 5, 2012--MACHINE GUNS AND MORTARS
By Adam Nossiter

Malian military officials agree. “Robust, powerful machine guns,” said Lt. Col. Diarran Kone of the Defense Ministry. “Mortars,” he added, describing the weaponry as “significant enough to allow them to achieve their objectives.”






THE GLOBE AND MAIL UK//FEBRUARY 10, 2012--HEAVY WEAPONS
By Geoffery York

In Mali, meanwhile, a rebellion by nomadic Tuareg separatists has been greatly strengthened by the return of battle-hardened Tuareg fighters from Libya, where they were serving in the Gadhafi military until the demise of the Libyan dictator.

The rebels, who launched an offensive in northern Mali on Jan. 17, are reportedly using heavy weapons that they obtained from Libyan military arsenals, including portable missile systems, anti-tank rockets and machine guns mounted on four-wheel-drive vehicles.

BLOOMBERG//MARCH 23, 2012--TOUAREGS WITH GUNS
By Diakaridia Dembele

Weapons and ammunition from Libyan stockpiles, including anti-aircraft artillery and explosives, were smuggled into Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso, according to the report.

Some of the estimated 2,000 Touareg rebels who have returned from Libya had been high-ranking officers in the Libyan army.






3000 FIGHTERS (EACH KATIBA HAS 100 FIGHTERS)

THE MALI REBELLION

Chronology from All Africa; April 6, 2012


November 2010: Meeting in Timbuktu, attended mainly by Tuaregs from the north, ends with foundation of Mouvement national de l'Azaoud (MNA) - National Movement of Azawad - which rejects violence but calls for display of solidarity from Azawadians inside Mali and beyond the country's borders.

February 2011: Speaking at ceremony near Kidal, Touré announces major new programme for the north that "will bring urgent solutions to the re-establishment of peace and security", and help young people "to find work and be saved from illicit and dangerous activities". Unimpressed, Tuareg spokesman Hama Ag Sid Ahmed warns, "For two years we have tried to renew dialogue with the central authorities. We see that nothing is advancing on the ground."

August 2011: Six months on from the Kidal ceremony, Touré launches the Programme spécial pour la paix, la sécurité et la Paix et le développement au Nord-Mali (PSPDN) -Special Programme for Peace, Security and Development in the North - with a budget of CFA32 billion (around US$65 million), focusing on security, employment, women and youth projects and income-generation, and backed by the European Union (EU), World Bank, UN Development Programme (UNDP) and other donors. The programme is headed by Mohamed Ag Erlaf, a Tuareg from Kidal.

August 2011: Reports of arrival in Malian territory of heavily armed Tuaregs coming from Libya via Algeria and Niger.

26 August 2011: Death in a car crash of Ibrahim Ag Bahanga, leader of ANTM. Bahanga was believed to have been heavily involved in the recruitment of Tuareg combatants from Libya.

16 October 2011: Creation of Mouvement National pour la libération de l'Azaoud (MNLA) - National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad. The Mouvement national de l'Azaoud (MNA) - National Movement of Azawad (MNA) - fuses with the more hardline ATNM. The new movement defines its main objective as "to free the people of Azawad from illegal occupation of Azawadian territory by Mali.

November 2011: Civil society organization in Gao warn of worsening security problems in the region.

January 2012: MNLA accuses the government of military provocation and a series of broken promises, and launches rebellion attacks on Ménaka in far north. The movement says its objective is "winning peace and justice for the Azawad community" and "stability for our region".

17-31 January 2012: After initial rebel attacks on Ménaka, further fighting reported in different parts of the north, including Ageul-hoc, Tessalit, Léré, Andéramboukane and Nianfunké. Contradictory reports on military gains and losses from Malian military and MNLA, but government army reported to be losing ground.
Human rights organizations, including Amnesty International, condemn government's handling of the war and use of military helicopters against civilian targets. Reports surface of massacre of government troops at Aguel-hoc after being taken over by MNLA, triggering rumours of MNLA alliance WITH Salafist Muslim extremists. Rebels strongly deny allegations.

1-2 February 2012: Protests in garrison town of Kati, 15km outside Bamako, directed at the Touré government for conduct of the war, and at the local Tuareg community. Political leaders and civil society activists warn against extremists using the situation in the north to stoke inter-ethnic tensions. Amnesty International accuses security forces of doing nothing to prevent attacks on houses and property belonging to Tuaregs, Arabs and Mauritanians. President Touré broadcasts appeal for calm and unity on national television.

2 February 2012: Talks open in Algiers between government of Mali and representatives of former Tuareg rebel movement, the ADC. They end two days later with appeal for peace, but this is dismissed by MNLA as irrelevant.

3-4 February 2012: Reports from Kidal of attempted rebel push on the town.

7 February 2012: Population abandons Tessalit in far north as rebels reportedly lay siege to the town.

8 February 2012: Rebels take Tinzawaten in the far north.

17 February 2012: The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) estimates that 44,000 refugees have fled into Niger, Burkina Faso and Mauritania.
Heads of state from the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) meeting in Abuja, the Nigerian capital, express concern about the deteriorating humanitarian and security situation in Mali, condemning the MNLA rebellion and giving unreserved support to the efforts of Mali to defend its territorial integrity.

18 February 2012: MNLA attacks Hombori, a town on the main road between Mopti and Gao. Rebels deny government accusations of killing a military chief in the area.

21 February 2012: Government commission reports back on Aguel-hoc and confirms the killing of government soldiers by AQIM combatants collaborating with MNLA. The report is strongly denied by MNLA.

24 February 2012: In an interview with Radio France Internationale (RFI), Touré maintains that elections will go ahead and Mali will have a new President on 10 June.

26 February 2012: Collectif des ressortissants du nord Mali - Collective of Nationals from the north of Mali (COREN) - meets in Bamako and adopts action plan on restoring state control of the north, stressing the need for protecting populations under threat.

10 March 2012: Mali's spiritual leaders issue a joint call for peace and dialogue.

10-11 March 2012: MNLA takes control of Tessalit, close to the Algerian frontier, while Malian military talks of 'strategic withdrawal'.

13 March 2012: Former Tuareg leader Iyad Ag Ghali sends out video claiming that the Ansar Dine movement, first reported on in December 2011, has played a key role in the conflict, but is fighting for imposition of Shariah law and not a separate Azawad.

15 March 2012: In an interview with French daily Le Figaro, Touré blames the rebellion on fall-out from the Libyan conflict and accuses AQIM of supporting the rebellion. Touré says the government is ready for dialogue, but rules out any partition of Mali.

21 March 2012: Soldiers mutiny at Gao and Bamako, protesting against poor leadership of the war and their lack of resources. Mutinous troops converge on the presidential palace and ORTM-TV station headquarters. Sporadic gunfire reported in Bamako.

22 March 2012: In a dawn broadcast, a group of soldiers describing itself as the National Committee for the Restoration of Democracy and Rule of Law (CNDRE) announces coup, blaming Touré for poor handling of the war. CNDRE declares suspension of the constitution, announces a curfew and closes frontiers. Many shops and businesses remain closed in Bamako. Ousted president Touré's whereabouts not known, but he is reported to be safe. Several ministers and leading politicians detained.
Coup brings instant condemnation from the United States and the African Union. MNLA restates its objective of securing independence for Azawad.

26 March 2012: UN Security Council condemns seizure of power by CNDRE, and "demands they cease all violence and return to their barracks". The Security Council calls for "the restoration of constitutional order, and the holding of elections as previously scheduled":

29 March 2012: ECOWAS leaders' mission to Mali cancelled for security reasons. Leaders convene in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, where they issue warning to CNDRE to quit power within 72 hours or face wide-ranging sanctions. Burkina Faso President Blaise Comporé confirmed as ECOWAS mediator.

30 March 2012: Rebels in control of Kidal, capital of Mali's northernmost region, after clashes at military bases outside the town. Witnesses confirm presence of combatants from both MNLA and Ansar Dine.

31 March 2012: MNLA confirms capture of Gao.
MNLA reports defection to its ranks of Colonel Major Elhadj Ag Gamou, a former rebel commander who has headed government military operations in the north. In MNLA communiqué issued from Kidal, Gamou calls on "all Azawadis to join and strengthen the MNLA in its struggle for independence".
Muslim and Christian leaders call for peace at a stadium rally attended by 25,000 in Bamako, urging both Malian leaders and regional heads of state to work for dialogue.

1 April: Reports from Timbuktu point to an Ansar Dine takeover from MNLA, and chasing away MNLA combatants. Reports of widespread looting in Gao as rebels take over.

2 April: ECOWAS leaders impose wide-ranging sanctions on military junta. The ECOWAS Chairman, President Alassane Ouattara of Côte d'Ivoire, confirms that "All diplomatic, economic, financial measures and others are applicable from today and will not be lifted until the re-establishment of constitutional order." Non-ECOWAS members Algeria and Mauritania back the measures. Aid operations in the north are largely on hold.

3 April 2012: Military junta leaders ignore ECOWAS demands to immediately exit from power, repeating instead their demand for an open-ended transition to civilian rule and reinstatement of constitutional law.

4 April 2012: Civil society organizations and some 50 political parties refuse to take part in discussions with junta leaders on Mali's future.

5 April 2012: The UN Security Council calls for a ceasefire in the north and a return to democracy. The MNLA announces an end to military operations in northern Mali, having achieved their objective.

6 April 2012: The MNLA declare independence of the northern region of Azawad, calling for a unilateral ceasefire.

[ This report does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations ]