Thursday, March 6, 2014

CRIMEA: MELITOPOL BOMBER BASE

TO: ANALYSIS
FROM: AERIAL LAB
SUBJ: STATUS QUO, MAPPING

IT IS BECOMING INCREASING CLEAR THAT RUSSIA FACES TWO CONCERNS FROM THE AIR ADVANTAGE POSED BY THE UKRAINE.

FIRST, RUSSIA'S LACK OF BLACK SEA AIRSPACE CONTROL DUE TO ITS LIMITED ACCES TO AIRFIELDS

SECOND, THE LARGE SOUTHERN REGION AIRBASE IN MELITOPOL, LONG-RANGE BOMBER COMMAND UNDER UKRAINIAN TERRITORIAL CONTROL

BOTH OF THE ABOVE MAKE IT MANDATORY THAT RUSSIA REGAIN CONTROL OF ITS FLANK IN THE BLACK SEA REGION



DIST ALL CH

CRIMEA: PHOTO SITREP #0307K: SAM MISSILE SITE

TO: MAP DIV
FROM: AERIAL RECON
SUBJ: YET ANOTHER INSTALLATION

THIS ONE SOUTH OF LARGE N. NAVAL BASE ON BLACK SEA



MORE AS MADE AVAIL

DIST ALL VIA USUAL TXT ET MOBILE....UNCLASSIFIED...

CRIMEA: PHOTO SITREP #0307J

TO: STRAT
FROM: AERIAL DIV
SUBJ: HELICOPTER//BOMBER BASE

ABOVE SEVASTOPOL WITH AIRSTRIP, ASSORTED ROTARY WING AND FIXED WING LIGHT BOMBERS AT AIRFIELD.



DIST ASAP ALL UNITS, FIELD + ECHELON....

CRIMEA PHOTO SITREP #0307G--MISSILE SITE

TOz: LAB
FROM: RECON
SUBJ: SEVASTOPOL MISSILE DEF INSTALLATION

BELOW FIND AERIAL IMAGERY OF REC LOC BASE:




FWD ALL COMPONENTS VIA ASAP TRANS..

CRIMEA PHOTOSITREP #0307B

TO: PHOTO LAB
FROM" AERIAL RECON
SUBJ: RUSSIAN AIR STRENGTH IN AOR

BELOW RECENT SATELLITE IMAGERY OF RUSSIAN AIRCRAFT LOC BELBEK FIELD, SEVASTOPOL..//







FWD ALL DIVS VIA SECURE CH......

ASAP....

CRIMEA NOTES: SIEGE OF SEVASTOPOL 1942

TO: FIELD CMDRS:
FROM: STRAT HQ
SUBJ:  ERICH VON MANSTEIN


BELOW FIND A BRIEF SYNOPSIS OF THE NAZI BATTLE FOR THE CRIMEAN CITY OF SEBASTOPOL.



Crimea and the Battle of Sevastopol (1941–1942)

In September 1941 Manstein was appointed commander of the 11th Army after its previous commander, Colonel-General Eugen Ritter von Schobert, perished when his plane landed in a Russian minefield. The 11th Army was tasked with invading the Crimean Peninsula, capturing Sevastopol, and pursuing enemy forces on the flank of Army Group South during its advance into Russia. Hitler's intention was to prevent the Russians from using airbases there, and to cut off the Russian supply of oil from the Caucasus.
Manstein's forces—mostly infantry—achieved a rapid breakthrough during the first days against heavy Soviet resistance. After most of the neck of the Perekop Isthmus had been taken, his forces were substantially reduced, leaving six German divisions and the Romanian Third Army. The rest of the Perekop Isthmus was captured slowly and with some difficulty; Manstein complained of a lack of air support to contest Russian air superiority in the region. He next created a mobile reconnaissance unit to press down the peninsula, cutting the road between Simferopol and Sevastopol on 31 October. Simferopol was captured the next day. The 11th Army had captured all of the Crimean Peninsula—except for Sevastopol—by 16 November. Meanwhile, the Red Army had evacuated 300,000 personnel out of the city by sea.

Manstein's first attack on Sevastopol in November failed, and with insufficient forces left for an immediate assault, he ordered an investment of the heavily fortified city. By 17 December he launched another offensive, which also failed. On 26 December the Soviets landed on the Kerch Straits to retake Kerch and its peninsula, and on 30 December executed another landing near Feodosiya. Only a hurried withdrawal from the area, in contravention of Manstein's orders, by the 46th Infantry Division under General Hans Graf von Sponeck prevented a collapse of the eastern part of the Crimea; the division lost most of its heavy equipment. Manstein cancelled a planned resumption of the attack and sent most of his forces east to destroy the Soviet bridgehead. The Soviets were in a superior position regarding men and materiel as they were able to re-supply by sea, and were therefore pushed by Stalin to conduct further offensives. However, the Russians were unable to capture the critical rail and road access points which would have cut the German lines of supply.

For the Battle of the Kerch Peninsula, launched on 8 May 1942, Hitler finally assigned Manstein major air support. The 11th Army was outnumbered on the ground, so Manstein had them feint an attack in the north while the bulk of the force attacked to the south. The Soviets were soon fleeing. Manstein recorded in his memoirs the capture of "170,000 prisoners, 1,133 guns, and 258 tanks". Kerch was captured on 16 May. The Germans lost only 8,000 men.

After a month's delay, Manstein turned his attention once more to the capture of Sevastopol, a battle in which Germany used some of the largest guns ever built. Along with large numbers of regular artillery pieces, super-heavy 600 mm (24 in) Karl-Gerät mortars and the 800 mm (31 in) "Dora" railway gun were brought in for the assault. A furious barrage began on the morning of 2 June 1942. All of the resources of the Luftwaffe's Luftflotte 4, commanded by Wolfram von Richthofen, were committed; the barrage continued for five days before the ground assault began.

The 11th Army gained ground during mid-June, focusing their attention on the northern approaches to the city. Casualties were high on both sides as the month dragged on. Aware of the need to act before the German summer offensive of 1942 reduced the availability of reinforcements and supplies, Manstein ordered a surprise attack using amphibious landings across Severnaya Bay on 29 June. The operation was a success; Soviet resistance crumbled. On 1 July German forces entered the city while the Soviets conducted a disorganised evacuation, and Hitler promoted Manstein to Generalfeldmarschall the same day. The entire city was in German hands by 4 July.



DIST ALL VIA TXT ET AL

USS TRUXTUN TO BLACK SEA

TO: FIELD
FROM: NAVBUR
SUBJ
SKIPPER

A native of Staunton, Virginia, Commander Biehn graduated from the University of Virginia in 1995 and was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. Upon completion of his initial Surface Warfare Officer training, he reported to USS NORMANDY (CG 60) home ported in Norfolk, Virginia, where he served as the ship’s Damage Control Assistant. He then qualified as a Tomahawk cruise missile mission planner and served with Afloat Planning Systems Atlantic, deploying as a member of the JOHN F. KENNEDY Strike Group staff.

In 2000, Commander Biehn reported to the United States Naval Academy as an instructor in the Seamanship and Navigation Department. He also served as a Yard Patrol craft Officer-in-Charge and received the Apgar Award for excellence in teaching and leadership.
After completing Department Head School, Commander Biehn returned to NORMANDY as the Weapons Officer and Combat Systems Officer, completing his third deployment to the Arabian Gulf. He then reported to the Program Manager for Strike Planning and Execution Systems, where he focused on tactics development and program management for the Tomahawk Command and Control System. During this tour Commander Biehn deployed to Afghanistan as the fire support officer for a Joint Special Operations Task Force.
Upon returning from Afghanistan, Commander Biehn was assigned to the headquarters of U. S. Central Command in Tampa, Florida, where he worked in the Operations Directorate. Commander Biehn reported to TRUXTUN in August, 2011 as the Executive Officer.
On August 10th, 2012 Commander Biehn took command as TRUXTUN's fourth Commanding Officer, relieving Commander John H. Ferguson.

DIST ALL DIVE VIA ASAP TXT CH

CRIMEA PHOTOSITREP #0307A


CRIMEA RUSSIAN OCCUPATION SITREP MAP #0307A


CRIMEA RUSSIAN OCCUPATION MAP


View CRIMEA CONFLICT 2014 in a larger map

CRIMEA SITREP #0306A

TO: INTEL
FROM: HQ
SUBJ: CRIMEA STATUS QUO

BELOW FIND RPTS FROM MATTHEWAID.COM:

Russian Troop Reinforcements Sent to Crimea Since February 28, 2014
According to reports appears in the Russian press and social media blogsites, the Russian military has probably reinforced the size of its troop contingent in the Crimea with an additional 10,000 - 15,000 troops since the military intervention began in earnest on February 27, 2014.

The ROPUCHA-class amphibious landing ship AZOV brought in 400 troops, as well as light armor and armored personnel carriers, from the Russian naval base at Novorossiysk on March 2, 2014.
These troops possibly belong to the 7th Guards Airborne Division based in Novorossiysk.

According to Ukrainian sources, dozens of flights by Russian IL-76 military transport aircraft have been detected landing at several Soviet-era bomber air bases at Gvardeyskoe and Oktyabyr’skoe airfields in the Crimea.

According to Russian social media reports, the following Russian Army units are now reportedly operating in the Crimea:

 * Elements of the 76th Airborne Division whose peacetime homebase is at Pskov in the St. Petersburg Oblast, is now reportedly operating in the Crimea. A blogger in Pskov reports that the division’s barracks are now “practically empty.”

 * The Russian 31st Guards Independent Airborne Assault Brigade based outside the city of Ul’yanovsk is now reportedly operating in the Crimea.

 * The 3rd Independent SPETSNAZ Brigade based at Tol’yatti, which is subordinate to the Russian military intelligence service, the GRU, is also reportedly operating in the Crimea

And more troop reinforcements are on their way YouTube videos posted online over the weekend show long troop convoys, including lots of tanks and APCs, headed for the port city of Novorossiysk and for the ferry terminal connecting the Kuban region of Russia with the port of Kerch in the Crimea. Given the capture of the Kerch ferry terminal earlier today by Russian troops without any resistance from Ukrainian border guards, I am guessing that the ferries, each capable of carrying several hundred troops plus tanks and APCs, have begun round-the-clock operations carrying one or more combat divisions to the Crimea.

MORE ASAP

....UPDATE ALL DIVS, FIELD ET....UNCLASSIFIED